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Herb of the Week — Diaphoretic RSS



Herb of The Week – Elder

   The Elder tree has been used medicinally for centuries throughout Europe. The oldest claim is perhaps its use by the Romans, who, among a variety of medicinal uses, used it to dye hair black. It has been common to eat the flowers or berries; make wine or syrup from the berries; make tea from the leaves, flowers, or inner bark; rub the bruised leaves on the skin; and make tea or tincture from the inner bark. 

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Herb of The Week – Yarrow

Yarrow has an ancient relationship with mankind, and has many uses, but yarrow's main effect and what it is most famous for is its ability to aid in the healing of wounds. Yarrow also helps with circulation, aiding in breaking fevers by causing sweating, and aiding in digestion.

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- Herb of The Week - Catnip

            This week, we'll be looking at the properties of the catnip plant. The Latin name for this plant is Nepeta cataria. It's other names include: Cataire, Catmint, Catnep, Catswort, Chataire, Field Balm, Herbe à Chat, Herbe aux Chats, Hierba Gatera, Menta de Gato, Menthe des Chats.                         Catnip is an ancient herb that has a long standing relationship with both mankind, and catkind. Growing native in Europe and Asia, it was used by Roman cooks and doctors. Records from England and France show that catnip was used as a hot drink before black tea became popular. European settlers brought catnip to the United States in the 1600's, introducing it to the Native Americans....

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Herb Of The Week - Osha

This week, we'll be investigating the properties of the Osha Root. The Latin name for this plant is Ligusticum porteri. It's other names include: Bear Medicine, Colorado Cough Root, Chuchupaste, Porter’s Wild Lovage, Indian Root, and Mountain Ginseng.               The root of the osha plant is a traditional Native American herb. Most Native American tribes treated this root with high regard as it was very crucial to their everyday needs. The tribal groups of the Zuni, Chiricahua, Tarahumara and Aztec were among the many groups who used this root. Osha got the name “bear medicine” because it was noted by Native Americans and early settlers that bears would seek it out when they first emerged from hibernation as a...

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