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Herb of the Week — Diabetes RSS



Herb of the Week – Allspice

       Allspice, used as a spice and medicinal herb, is the dried, unripe berry or fruit of the evergreen pimento tree. Other common names include: Jamaican pepper, pimento, pimenta, clove pepper, myrtle pepper, and newspice.The tree grows 22 to 43 feet high on average, but is slow growing. Its leaves are leathery, glossy, and elliptical-shaped. The tree blooms with small white flowers in the spring and fall, turning to clusters of brownish-green berries in the fall. The tree is cultivated in tropical regions, and is native to southern Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.  Allspice contains a chemical compound called eugenol that is known to be antiseptic and anesthetic. Allspice is also carminative, antidiarrheal, aromatic, a...

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Herb of the Week – Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus leaves in general have been used traditionally for ages by the aboriginals in its native habitat (primarily continental Australia and Tasmania). It has been used topically to treat wounds and fungal infections, and internally as a tea to help with fever. In Chinese and Indian traditional medicine, Eucalyptus has been used for treatment of these and a variety of other ailments. Eucalyptus has been used since the 19th century to disinfect catheters.

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Herb of The Week – Elder

   The Elder tree has been used medicinally for centuries throughout Europe. The oldest claim is perhaps its use by the Romans, who, among a variety of medicinal uses, used it to dye hair black. It has been common to eat the flowers or berries; make wine or syrup from the berries; make tea from the leaves, flowers, or inner bark; rub the bruised leaves on the skin; and make tea or tincture from the inner bark. 

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Herb of The Week – Cinnamon

            This week, we'll be looking into the attributes of the Cinnamon. The Latin name for the cinnamon tree is Cinnamomum zeylanicum. It's other names include: Batavia Cassia, Batavia Cinnamon, Ceylon Cinnamon, Cinnamomum verum, Dalchini, Écorce de Cannelle, Laurus cinnamomum, Madagascar Cinnamon, Padang-Cassia, Panang Cinnamon, Saigon Cassia, Saigon Cinnamon, Sri Lanka Cinnamon, Thwak, Tvak .              It is the specificity the bark of the cinnamon tree that comprises the herb we know as cinnamon.   Cinnamon's history reaches back to Egypt where it was being imported as early as 2000 BC. The Hebrew Bible makes a specific mention of cinnamon several times starting with Moses when he is commanded to use...

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